Bryanna Krause
 Anna L. Russell
 Ella Foster
 May Kesler
 Masha Balovlenkov
 Our dancers, with Officer Giebel on his horse, Guinness (Left) and Officer Brown and his horse, Chrissy (Right).
 Apparently, Guinness likes Anna's tutu! NOMNOMNOM
 Everywhere we go, people want to know, who we are, so we tell them... Dance Across the USA!!!  These folks were here for a leadership conference, and we asked them to not just watch, but to get in on this DATUSA thing!  Here with the lovely Masha Balovlenkov.
  The Statue:   Lying between the north and south chambers is the central hall containing the solitary figure of Lincoln sitting in contemplation. The statue was carved by the  Piccirilli Brothers  under the supervision of the sculptor,  Daniel Chester French , and took four years to complete. The statue, originally intended to be only 10 feet (3.0 m) tall, was, on further consideration, enlarged so that it finally stood 19 feet (5.8 m) tall from head to foot, the scale being such that if Lincoln were standing, he would be 28 feet (8.5 m) tall. The extreme width of the statue is the same as its height. The Georgia white marble sculpture weighs 175  short tons  (159  t ) and had to be shipped in 28 separate pieces.  The statue rests upon an oblong pedestal of Tennessee marble 10 feet (3.0 m) high, 16 feet (4.9 m) wide, and 17 feet (5.2 m) deep. Directly beneath this lies a platform of Tennessee marble about 34.5 feet (10.5 m) long, 28 feet (8.5 m) wide, and 6.5 inches (0.17 m) high. Lincoln's arms rest on representations of Roman  fasces , a subtle touch that associates the statue with the Augustan (and imperial) theme (obelisk and funerary monuments) of the Washington Mall. The statue is discretely bordered by two pilasters, one on each side. Between these pilasters and above Lincoln's head stands the engraved epitaph, composed by  Royal Cortissoz , shown in the box to the left  For more information about visiting the Lincoln Memorial, please click on the below link:  https://www.nps.gov/linc/index.htm
 Construction of the monument began in 1848, and was halted from 1854 to 1877 due to a lack of funds, a struggle for control over the Washington National Monument Society, and the intervention of the American Civil War. Although the stone structure was completed in 1884, internal ironwork, the knoll, and other finishing touches were not completed until 1888. A difference in shading of the marble, visible approximately 150 feet (46 m) or 27% up, shows where construction was halted and later resumed with marble from a different source. The original design was by Robert Mills, but he did not include his proposed colonnade due to a lack of funds, proceeding only with a bare obelisk. Despite many proposals to embellish the obelisk, only its original flat top was altered to a pointed marble  pyramidion , in 1884. The cornerstone was laid on July 4, 1848; the first stone was laid atop the unfinished stump on August 7, 1880; the capstone was set on December 6, 1884; and the completed monument was dedicated on February 21, 1885. It officially opened October 9, 1888. Upon completion, it became the world's tallest structure, a title previously held by the Cathedral. The monument held this designation until 1889, when the Eiffel Tower was completed in Paris, France.  The monument was damaged during the 2011 Virginia Earthquake and Hurricane Irene in the same year and remained closed to the public while the structure was assessed and repaired. After 32 months of repairs, the National Park Service and the Trust for the National Mall reopened the Washington Monument to visitors on May 12, 2014.  For more information on visiting the Washington Monument, please click on the below link:  https://www.nps.gov/wamo/index.htm   
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